Embarrassment Can Cost Money

embarrassed

I was talking to a friend about her recent home buying experience. Things were going well in the beginning, but as closing approached more and more issues came up. They decided they didn’t like certain aspects of the house as much as they thought they would. Some of the renovations that they wanted to do were going to cost more than expected. Some issues arose at closing that soured the deal (I don’t know the specifics). They even started having second thoughts about the neighborhood. Yet despite all of this, they bought the house anyway. They are now unhappy and stuck.

When I asked why on earth they went through with the purchase, she hemmed and hawed and said, “Well, we

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7 Responses to Embarrassment Can Cost Money

  1. Julie says:

    I completely agree with you. Not enough is written about this subject. I think people are embarrassed to admit they are embarrased to be firm when shopping.

  2. Chelle says:

    I am guilty of this once in awhile, especially when I have my kids shopping with me. I hate having to say no to everything every time we go shopping, so sometimes I say yes just to avoid for them from making a scene or acting up in the store. It’s definitely something for me to be more mindful of next time we go shopping.

  3. jay says:

    Though much less significant than a house, it’s also true you haven’t bought all those things you unload at the checkout counter. Set them aside if you have any doubts. This includes whatever the kids slipped into the cart.

    If you have buyer’s remorse before driving off the lot (or within a reasonable time period), don’t hesitate to turn around, go back in and ask to return the item. I can guarantee that, nine times out of ten, clerks don’t care about you personally (just doing their job), and won’t judge you. When I realized this, it freed me from those nagging, guilty, “why DID I buy this??” thoughts.

    Same thought pattern if you think an error was made. Now I try to remember to check the register slip before I walk out the door. More than once I’ve gone back and corrected things. Foolish not to; no fault need be ascribed, just a mistake!

  4. jay says:

    Also, this story reminds me of the first time we considered refinancing our home. They insisted on folding the car loan into the new mortgage. This was AT the signing! We signed the papers, but when we talked it through later, we realized what a bad idea it was. Called and canceled the next day. There was a three day window for canceling, so we were released from the loan. The mortgage folks did slam the phone in my ear, but too bad!

  5. Tony says:

    I’ve always been more conservative with my money than most. There were more than a few times when I had to go along with extra drinks etc. even when I did not want them just to fit in with the crowd.

    I bet this kind of peer pressure spending is a good chunk of what a lot of people spend.

  6. Gailete says:

    One of the worst things I ever did due to embarassemnt was going ahead with marrying my first husband. On the wedding day I knew I was making a mistake but was too embarassed to stop the wedding. I went through 13 grueling awful years that started on my wedding night on. The only good thing to show from that marriage was my 2 sons. I’m always so proud of brides-to-be that had the courage to say no at the last minute. They are so brave and no matter how it might hurt, eventually their life will get better, by not making a mistake then. If you know a girl or guy who did this, support them, don’t diss them.

  7. Such great advice! I too can now reflect on moments I know I should have backed out on deals I was literally talked in to. Something as simple as going along with group decisions and even my first marriage which I knew up to the last moment I should not have done.

    I have learned to pay attention to my instincts and gut feelings. Always, always take 24 hours to think about all major decisions, this way you can take the time to weigh the pro’s and con’s. Don’t let anyone else make the decision for you (ie. realtors, salespeople, bankers, etc.) other than making the decision with a partner or spouse. Do what’s best for you and stand by it.

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