Small Money Amounts Matter

debt snowflake

I have always been one who believes that it’s important to get all the big personal finance issues in order before you start looking at the small stuff. If you are losing several hundred dollars a month paying too high of an interest rate on your house payment and decide to spend your time trying to earn a few extra dollars in other ways instead, you have your money management priorities a little out of whack. That being said, once you have taken care of the big stuff, I believe that saving those small amounts is important. Earning small amounts is often referred to as snowflaking and the ways that you can go about creating these income streams is limited only by your imagination.

Whi

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17 Responses to Small Money Amounts Matter

  1. Nina says:

    OK, so call me late to the party, but I just figured out that to enter you have to click on big box above and DO stuff. Ugh.

    Happy to tweet with frugal folks, follow me here
    http://twitter.com/prettycheap

    See you next time!

  2. littlegopher says:

    I find even when we have all the money accounted for in our budget, we can still go into ‘super saver’ mode.

    Maybe we normally would spend a certain amount for groceries, but by streamlining the list and choosing less expensive options, we don’t spend the whole amount and have the surplus to spend in another way.

    The same can be applied to other areas of the budget too. We’ve had to do this for a year with unexpected high medical bills, but also for a bigger vacation one year (a far more fun way to spend the money.)

    The easiest and quickest way for us to accumulate more money is working overtime. Time and a half adds up faster than any other way we could do it otherwise.

  3. Diane says:

    This may not be a popular answer, because it involves using a credit card… but I use my Chase Rewards card for purchases I’m going to make anyway and pay it off each month. I pay no interest, but accumulate rewards & Chase sends me a CHECK for the amount owned whenever I request one. It really adds up! I also save change & pick up change from the ground.

  4. jaime says:

    we recycle cans…although we don’t get much because we rarely drink soda and most of the time it’s small kid size water bottles.

  5. Sass says:

    I am currently trying to fund as much of Christmas as I can through giveaway entries and such. I read an article about it on another blog and I’ve had a lot of “downtime” due to a light workload and some other issues. Might as well make good use of it!

  6. Nancy says:

    Selling unused and outgrown clothes helps declutter and save money. Investigate ebay and craigslist, but also consider holding a group rummage. Specialty items like like skates, snow pants, and baby needs tend to go fast on craigslist.

  7. PatientSaver says:

    I am more in the camp of making “big” moves to save money because I think focusing obssessively on the small stuff will be a distraction from more meaningful ways to spend your time, BUT of course if you’re the frugal type, you’re frugal across the board.

    I guess my snowflake efforts are more a mentality when it comes to my freelance clients. While I charge the going rate forcorporations that I know can afford to pay me, I don’t turn away small-time clients who would not be able to afford to pay that much, either, sometimes because they’re paying me out of their own pocket.

    For instance, i’ve had one client for over a year now who for most of that year, gave me maybe $20 max of business on any given week, editing his work emails, believe it or not. he’s a successful guy in his field, but writing is not his thing; perhaps he has dyslexia…not really sure.

    But my point is, I always welcomed his work even though I was charging him an infinitely small amount based solely on the time spent editing his emails, which was usually a 5 or 10-minute deal.

    Last week, he finally had something more substantial for me, editing a report for which I was able to charge quite a bit more.

    So it pays to cultivate relationships, no matter how insignificant they may appear to be. That is how my small snowflakes grow bigger over time.

  8. PatientSaver says:

    Where do you announce the winners of each contest?

  9. PatientSaver says:

    Oh, never mind. I see it

  10. Monkey Mama says:

    I don’t shop a lot, so I am not in the habit of using coupons. OFten when I shop online I see the “coupon code” box and that is the reminder for me. & it happens enough it has become more habit to look up coupons before I make an online purchase. But, anyway, I had to hit a couple of physical stores last week (prepping for vacation, etc.) and I figured I better check for coupons. Spending one minute online to check for coupons netted me about $5 in savings. It could have added up to *a lot* more if I was spending more than a few dollars here and there. I found a 15%-off coupon for one store and a 40%-off at another store.

    Anyway, I was thinking I should start a coupon snowflake challenge to get me in a better habit of *always looking for coupons.*

  11. judyyy says:

    thanks for the chance

  12. judyyy says:

    I use rebate checks to make small debt payments

  13. Jeffrey says:

    The winners are announced in the entry form above — it has a nice feature from random.org that picks the winners — you can see an example from the last contest with all the winners announced there: http://www.savingadvice.com/articles/2012/09/09/1011867_debt-snowflake-giveaway.html

  14. Rian says:

    I agree – small amounts matter – thanks!

  15. kat says:

    I save $5 a week every week in an ING account that I got $50 to open. Talk about snowflake.. but at least its not going to some expensive morning beverage

  16. Aleta says:

    One area of savings for me is at the self-check out counters. Recently, someone left a few automated coupons and one was for $1.00 off on my next purchase from the purchase of buying Gerber foods. Didn’t belong to the guy in front of me because he didn’t have any baby food or baby article. I took it to the courtesy counter and they gave me the dollar back. I have also found oodles of money in those change back slots. People are in a hurry and forget to get their change as well. Of course, there is always money on the ground somewhere. A couple of months ago, I found two 20′s and a 1. bill next to my car. A total of $41.00.

  17. nadine says:

    ask your doc for meds that can be cut in half and a script for double doses. twice as much for half the price.

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