The Best Place To Hide Money: Conversation With A Burglar

BurglarI had quite the interesting conversation this weekend with a person who happened to be a former burglar. It was great timing because I was wondering if something like the skid mark underwear for hiding money would really work. I also figured that if you wanted to know the best place to hide your money from a burglar, a former burglar was the person to ask.

I started off simply and was not surprised by the answer to the question “where is the best place to hide your money?”

“At the bank,” he said with a sly grin

When I rephrased and asked where the best place to hide money and valuables in the house would be if you had such items there, I was taken a bit by surprise b

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211 Responses to The Best Place To Hide Money: Conversation With A Burglar

  1. Rob says:

    If banks start dropping left and right and the FDIC cannot pay up then I think we have much bigger issues to worry about. It wont matter where you keep your money if it’s no longer worth anything.

  2. Rhonda says:

    Who cares if there is a red flag. Its YOUR money. They can’t say you can not take out your own money. You may have to answer questions on why. I know this by personal experience. I will do what I want with my own money.

  3. jstrada says:

    Very interesting perspective. Thinking about home security as a burglar also works. Make sure that your home is protected in order to keep a burglar out of it in the first place. Of course, keep all your doors and windows locked. Cut back vegetation from your home. Install motion detector lights on both your front and back door. Consider installing a home security system in order to add an extra layer of protection.

    Joe Strada

  4. commander sloppy pants says:

    Hide the loot in a box of frozen fish sticks. take half the product out and toss it. fill the rest up with your cash (inside a ziplock bag for protection) and reseal the fish sticks box with crazy glue so it looks kosher

  5. mickey david says:

    the number of burglaries traditionally spike in the summer months & i think ivis security systems are an excellent solution to deter burglars.

  6. SB says:

    yes, or a money addict

  7. SB says:

    I have one hell of a Wheaten Terrier, barks at everything, knows who is and isn’t friendly. I feel safe with a dog, I’m able to sleep at night. And my rottweiler, a beauty (doesn’t let anyone near the house, but loves my Wheaten)!!!!!

  8. Euhill says:

    I once had 4K in Bank of America in the early 90’s. I then opened an account with a credit union. I just transfered the money in small amounts over a period of six months. I did it mainly to avoid delays in getting my money out of Bank of America. I found out quickly that they take a long time to process your withdrawal request if you ask for a large sum of money to be taken out of your account. So I decided to do it in smaller amounts gradually. It’s preferrable to have more than one bank account with different banks, say two to four different banks opened at different times (one account every 6 to nine months), and stash your money between the different banks. So when it comes time to withdraw it you won’t be likely to trip any flags as long as the withdrawals are not big from any one bank.

  9. Euhill says:

    Actually you should care about tripping flags, especially if you run a cash based business (a convenience store for instance) and need to deposit those funds in a bank. There have been some honest people who used only one bank and ended up having the bank file a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) on them. Then the FEDS come in and freeze their account while a criminal investigation takes place. All it takes is the bank to think that you are involved in criminal activity for this to happen even if you are not. So if you deal with large sums of money that is legslly earned, it is best to deal with more than one bank to avoid these types of problems.

  10. Robert says:

    Jon:

    The United States Bureau of Printing and Engraving has specialist that will sort, identify and recover damaged US currency at no cost to the consumer. It may take several weeks but it can be done.They do it all the time with money found in cans buried, frozen in freezers, etc.

  11. jenni says:

    I was robbed over the summer and my sister’s house was just robbed overnight. I could not agree with this sentiment more.

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